Nar Phu valley Trekking in Nepal

Warm greeting From Himalayan Country in the world. Ace vision Nepal offer many outdoor activities in Nepal, Among them this is really remote and very less tourist in this trekking area. Nar Phu valley Trek lies in the most remote region of the Manang District and access is granted only with the purchase of a special Area. This area consists of two main villages – Nar with 300 permanent residents called Nar-ten and Phu with 200 permanent residents called Phu-ten. These remote villages are situated above tree line and completely cut off during the snowy winter months. Residents of these valleys make their livelihood mainly from herding yak and trading meat, wool and hides with the villages located in the lower regions of Manang.

Nar and Phu Valley Trek, Settled around the 10th Century by Tibetan herders and traders migrating south from Tibet, the inhabitants of Phu once placed high value on their remote and strategic location. Tall stone lookout towers, now standing in ruins, where used to spot possible invaders coming from all directions and thick wooden doors where bolted shut at night locking the residents securely inside. We can have the entire day to explore this fascinating area. We can have the great pleasure of sightseeing inside the Tashi Lakhang Monastery, which sites high above the village. Tashi Lakhang – ‘the blessed house of gods’ is one of the oldest monasteries (or Gompas) in Manang.As well as it is an Annapurna Circuit Trekking in Nepal. The Gompa is one of 108 constructed by Lama Urgen Lhundup Gyatso and, along with the monastery in Braga, makes up the heart of spiritual life in the Manang District. It takes two days to reach Naar from Phu Village, the principal and seemingly more prosperous village in these remote valleys. Naar, situated at 13,730 feet, is also called Chuprong meaning ‘the place of Blue Sheep.

The original inhabitants of this valley are believed to be from Tibet’s ancient Shang Sung Kingdom arriving sometime in the 8th Century and converted from Bon to Buddhism after the birth of Buddha in Lumbini. Nar Village sits above a large flat plain which make up the extensive agriculture fields being plowed by teams of humans and their yak. It seemed as though the entire village population are in the fields turning the soil and planting seeds in anticipation for the summer rains. As in Phu, wandering around the village and observing local life untainted by the outside world is fascinating.
Highlights of the Trip:

  • Exploring the lost valley of Naar and Phu Village,
  • Visit to the ancient Buddhist Monasteries including
  •  Tashi Lakhang Monastery is listed out of the 108 world’s great Buddhist Monasteries;
  •  it is believed to be the last monastery constructed by Karmapa Rinpoche,
  •  Ruined forts of the Khampa settlement (the place which Khampa refugees from Tibet  once captured and lived illegally),
  •   Nepal’s classic trek with a wide range of spectacular mountain scenery to cross Kang-la Pass,
  •  crossing over high suspension bridges,
  •  smooth gradual walking up through subtropical the dense Rhododendron and Pine forest to a Tibetan-influenced valley,
  •  meeting local people and their cultural mix takes in Gurung,
  •  Manangis communities, passing several Buddhist monuments and their traditional stone-walled villages,
  •   worthwhile side trip to Milarepa’s Cave from Braga,
  •   popular excursion trip to Praken Gompa and Chongar View Point from Manang,

Ace vision is your Outdoor travel Partner Contact us for more detail about Nar phu valley trekking in Nepal, with customized trip.

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